Raymond Ameijide: Illustrator of the Week

Don’t Run with Scissors…

Ameijide served as an illustrator a variety of clients, including Fortune, National Geographic, IBM, Pfizer, TV Guide, Chase Manhattan, Discover, Harcourt Brace and the United States Post Office.[1] He won numerous awards for his illustrations from various organizations and clubs, such as the Art Directors Club. His work is honored by the book The Illustrator In America 1880–1980 A Century of Illustration by Walt and Roger Reed.[2]

Ameijide employed 3-D layering of cutouts of various colored papers to create his caricatures, having originated and developed paper and felt sculptures, which were then photographed, as illustrations in the mid-1950s.




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How an Illustration is Made

Images from the Salem Trilogy of Books

Below you will see the steps from sketches to comps.

Graphite drawings are done on separate pieces of paper, scanned, and then painted. They are scanned again and composed like Colorforms on Photoshop until the final illustration is created. Take a look!

Click on image for larger slideshow.

That is how the illustration for Ratatoskr and Charlie Bumpus in front of the Essex Institute from A walk Through Salem was made.

Read about Ratatoskr who lives in front of the Essex Institute in A Walk Through Salem the fairy tale set in the whimsical magical side of Salem in which you are the main character. Available at Remember Salem, Wicked Good Books, Barnes & Noble, and Amazon.com Or you can buy it directly fromwww.salemhousepress.com and give more of the profit to the author. Look for new AR version coming out this Summer.

~ Mr. Zac

Come back every Tuesday at 3PM for new stories about Salem and images from the Salem Trilogy.

Constantin Alajalov: Illustrator of the Week

A Touch of Humor…

Constantin Alajálov (also Aladjalov) (18 November 1900 – 23 October 1987) was an American painter and illustrator.[1] He was born in Rostov, Russia and immigrated to New York City in 1923, becoming a US citizen in 1928. Many of his illustrations were covers for such magazines as The New Yorker, The Saturday Evening Post,[2] and Fortune.[3] He also illustrated many books, including the first edition of George Gershwin’s Song Book. His works are in New York’s Museum of Modern Art and the Brooklyn Museum. He died in Amenia, New York.




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Elenore Abbott: Illustrator of the Week

Once Upon a Tale…

Abbott, known for her book illustrations, was also a landscape and portrait painter and scenic designer,[5] including work for Hedgerow Theatre‘s production of The Emperor Jones.[4] She produced illustrations for Harper’s Magazine, the Saturday Evening Post,[4] and Scribner’s magazines.[4][6] Abbott created illustrations for books, such as Robert Louis Stevenson‘s Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Johann David Wyss‘s Swiss Family Robinson, Louisa May Alcott‘s Old Fashioned Girl, and the Grimm’s Fairy Tales.[4]




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Coles Phillips: Illustrator of the Week

Simultaneous Contrast?

The work of Phillips quickly became popular with the Life readers. In May 1908, he created a cover for the magazine that featured his first “fadeaway girl” design with a figure whose clothing matched, and disappeared into, the background.[5][6] Phillips developed this idea in many subsequent covers.

Phillips’ use of negative space allowed the viewer to “fill-in” the image; it also reduced printing costs for the magazine, as “the novelty of the technique and the striking design qualities masked the fact that Life was getting by with single color or two-color covers in a day when full-color covers were de rigueur for the better magazines”.[2] Phillips worked in watercolor and always painted from life; according to his biographer, Michael Schau, “he refused to work from photographs or to use the pantograph“.[7]

Phillips produced cover art for other national magazines besides Life, including Good Housekeeping, which for two years (beginning in July 1912) made him their sole cover artist.[8] Phillips also created many advertising images for makers of women’s clothing, and for such clients as the Overland automobile company and Oneida Community flatware. His series depicting women wearing Holeproof Hosiery products was considered daring for its time.[9] Phillips’ works also appear in the 1921 and 1922 editions of the U. S. Naval Academy yearbook, Lucky Bag.




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Robert McGinnis: Illustrator of the Week

Shaken, Not Stirred…


Robert Edward McGinnis (born February 3, 1926)[1] is an American artist and illustrator. McGinnis is known for his illustrations of more than 1,200 paperback book covers,[2] and over 40 movie posters, including Breakfast at Tiffany’s (his first film poster assignment),[3] Barbarella, and several James Bond and Matt Helm films.[4]




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Richard Amsel: Illustrator of the Week

Get Your Popcorn….

Amsel quickly found popularity within New York’s art scene, and his illustrations caught the attention of Barry Manilow, then a young singer/songwriter named who was working with Bette Midler, a newly emerging entertainer in cabaret clubs and piano bars. Manilow introduced the two, and it was quickly decided that Amsel should do the cover of her first Atlantic Records album. The cover, for The Divine Miss M proved to be one of the most ubiquitous of the year. More album covers and posters soon followed, as did a series of magazine ads for designer Oleg Cassini.[citation needed]

His movie posters commissions included some of the most important and popular films of the 1970s, including The Champ, Chinatown, Julia, The Last Picture Show, The Last Tycoon, The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, The Muppet Movie, Murder on the Orient Express, Nashville, Papillon, The Shootist, and The Sting. (The latter’s poster design paid homage to the painting style of J. C. Leyendecker, evoking both his “Arrow Collar Man” and his covers for The Saturday Evening Post.)[citation needed]

Though brief, Amsel’s career was prolific. By the decade’s end his movie posters alone matched or exceeded the creative output of many of his contemporaries. His portrait of comedian Lily Tomlin was featured on the cover of Time, and is now housed in the permanent collection at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. In keeping with the magazine’s stringent deadlines, Amsel’s illustration was created in only two or three days.




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