Illustrator of the Week: Trina Schart Hyman

Fairytales!

Hyman won the annual Caldecott Medal from the American Library Association, recognizing the year’s best-illustrated U.S. children’s picture book, for Saint George and the Dragon, published by Little, Brown in 1984. Margaret Hodges wrote the text, retelling Edmund Spenser‘s version of the Saint George legend.[1] She also won the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award for picture books, recognizing King Stork (Little, Brown, 1973), text by Howard Pyle (1853–1911).

She was a Caldecott runner-up three times, for her own retelling of Little Red Riding Hood in 1984, Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins by Eric Kimmel in 1990, and A Child’s Calendar by John Updike in 2000.[1] And she was a Boston Globe–Horn Book picture book runner-up twice, for All in Free but Janey by Elizabeth Johnson in 1968 and On to Widecombe Fair by Patricia Gauch in 1978.

She is also considered one of the first white American illustrators (after Ezra Jack Keats) to incorporate black characters into her illustrations regularly, as a matter of principle, in large part triggered by her daughter’s marriage to a man from Cameroon. Her grandchildren appear in several of her books.

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For more info:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trina_Schart_Hyman

~Cheers,
Chris

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Illustrator of the Week: Jan Brett

Ufda!

Jan Brett (born December 1, 1949) is an American illustrator and writer of children’s picture books. She is known for colorful, detailed depictions of a wide variety of animals and human cultures ranging from Scandinavia to Africa. Her best-known titles include The MittenThe Hat, and Gingerbread Baby. She has adapted or retold numerous traditional stories such as the Gingerbread Man and Goldilocks and has illustrated some classics such as “The Owl and the Pussycat“.

Brett maintains a list of books online that may be complete for her original writings and adaptations. For almost every listing she identifies a specific setting such as Salzburg, Austria, for her first book as a writer, Fritz and the Beautiful Horses (1978), and Novgorod, Russia, for her recent adaptation Cinders: A Chicken Cinderella (2013).[4]

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For more info:

http://www.janbrett.com/index.html

~Cheers,
Chris

Illustrator of the Week:

The Shadow Knows!

Edward Daniel Cartier[1] (August 1, 1914 – December 25, 2008), known professionally as Edd Cartier, was an American pulp magazine illustrator who specialized in science fiction and fantasy art.

Born in North Bergen, New Jersey, Cartier studied at Pratt Institute. Following his 1936 graduation from Pratt, his artwork was published in Street and Smith publications, including The Shadow, to which he contributed many interior illustrations, and the John W. Campbell, Jr.-edited magazines Astounding Science FictionDoc Savage Magazine and Unknown.[1] His work later appeared in other magazines, including Planet StoriesFantastic Adventures and other pulps.

Cartier was given the 1992 World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1996 and 2001, he was nominated for Retro Hugo Awards for artwork published in 1945 and 1951.

Edd Cartier: The Known and the Unknown is a 2000-copy limited edition hardcover published by Gerry de la Ree in 1977. Cartier’s illustrations of L. Ron Hubbard’s fiction were reprinted in Master Storyteller: An Illustrated Tour of the Fiction of L. Ron Hubbard by William J. Widder (Galaxy Press, 2003.).

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For more info:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edd_Cartier

~Cheers,
Chris

Illustrator of the Week: Another Look at Richard Amsel

Adventures!

Amsel quickly found popularity within New York’s art scene, and his illustrations caught the attention of Barry Manilow, then a young singer/songwriter named who was working with Bette Midler, a newly emerging entertainer in cabaret clubs and piano bars. Manilow introduced the two, and it was quickly decided that Amsel should do the cover of her first Atlantic Records album. The cover, for The Divine Miss M proved to be one of the most ubiquitous of the year. More album covers and posters soon followed, as did a series of magazine ads for designer Oleg Cassini.

His movie posters commissions included some of the most important and popular films of the 1970s, including The ChampChinatownJuliaThe Last Picture ShowThe Last TycoonThe Life and Times of Judge Roy BeanMcCabe & Mrs. MillerThe Muppet MovieMurder on the Orient ExpressNashvillePapillonThe Shootist, and The Sting. (The latter’s poster design paid homage to the painting style of J. C. Leyendecker, evoking both his “Arrow Collar Man” and his covers for The Saturday Evening Post.)

Though brief, Amsel’s career was prolific. By the decade’s end his movie posters alone matched or exceeded the creative output of many of his contemporaries. His portrait of comedian Lily Tomlin was featured on the cover of Time, and is now housed in the permanent collection at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. In keeping with the magazine’s stringent deadlines, Amsel’s illustration was created in only two or three days.

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For more info:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Amsel

~Cheers,
Chris

Illustrator of the Week: Howard Pyle

The Father of the Pirates

I got to visit his Brandeywine School a few summers ago. His work was amazing. Unfortunately the Wyeth’s have taken it over….

In 1894 he began teaching illustration at the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and Industry (now Drexel University). After 1900, he founded his own school of art and illustration, named the Howard Pyle School of Illustration Art. The scholar Henry C. Pitz later used the term Brandywine School for the illustration artists and Wyeth family artists of the Brandywine region, several of whom had studied with Pyle.

Some of his more notable students were N. C. WyethFrank SchoonoverElenore AbbottEthel Franklin BettsAnna Whelan BettsHarvey Dunn, Clyde O. DeLand, Philip R. GoodwinViolet OakleyEllen Bernard Thompson PyleOlive RushAllen Tupper TrueElizabeth Shippen Green, and Jessie Willcox Smith.
His 1883 classic publication The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood remains in print, and his other books, frequently with medieval European settings, include a four-volume set on King Arthur. He is also well known for his illustrations of pirates, and is credited with creating what has become the modern stereotype of pirate dress.[2] He published his first novel, Otto of the Silver Hand, in 1888. He also illustrated historical and adventure stories for periodicals such as Harper’s Weekly and St. Nicholas Magazine. His novel Men of Iron was adapted as the movie The Black Shield of Falworth (1954). In 1905 he was elected into the National Academy of Design

Pictures From Howard Pyle

 ~Cheers,

Chris

Illustrator of the Week: N.C. Wyeth

Pirates!

Newell Convers Wyeth (October 22, 1882 – October 19, 1945), known as N.C. Wyeth, was an American artist and illustrator. He was the pupil of artist Howard Pyle and became one of America’s greatest illustrators.[1] During his lifetime, Wyeth created over 3,000 paintings and illustrated 112 books,[2] 25 of them for Scribner’s, the Scribner Classics, which is the work for which he is best known.[1] The first of these, Treasure Island, was one of his masterpieces and the proceeds paid for his studio. Wyeth was a realist painter just as the camera and photography began to compete with his craft.[3] Sometimes seen as melodramatic, his illustrations were designed to be understood quickly.[4] Wyeth, who was both a painter and an illustrator, understood the difference, and said in 1908, “Painting and illustration cannot be mixed—one cannot merge from one into the other

 

~Cheers,
Chris

Illustrator of the Week: Arthur Rackham

Fairies!

Arthur Rackham created the world of fairies, elves, gnomes and the other woodland creatures. He influenced Alan Lee and Brian Froud. His critters filled children’s head for nearly a century now!

Arthur Rackham is widely regarded as one of the leading illustrators from the ‘Golden Age’ of British book illustration which encompassed the years from 1900 until the start of the First World War. During that period, there was a strong market for high quality illustrated books that typically were given as Christmas gifts. Many of Rackham’s books were produced in a de luxe limited edition, often vellum bound and sometimes signed, as well as a larger, less ornately bound quarto ‘trade’ edition. This was often followed by a more modestly presented octavo edition in subsequent years for particularly popular books. The onset of the war in 1914 curtailed the market for such quality books, and the public’s taste for fantasy and fairies also declined in the 1920s.
Arthur Rackham’s works have become very popular since his death, both in North America and Britain. His images have been widely used by the greeting card industry and many of his books are still in print or have been recently available in both paperback and hardback editions. His original drawings and paintings are keenly sought at the major international art auction houses.

Technique

Rackham invented his own unique technique which resembled photographic reproduction; he would first sketch an outline of his drawing, then lightly block in shapes and details. Afterwards he would add lines in pen and India ink, removing the pencil traces after it had dried. With colour pictures, he would then apply multiple washes of colour until translucent tints were created. He would also go on to expand the use of silhouette cuts in illustration work, particularly in the period after the First World War, as exemplified by his Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella.[4]
Typically, Rackham contributed both colour and monotone illustrations towards the works incorporating his images – and in the case of Hawthorne’s Wonder Book, he also provided a number of part-coloured block images similar in style to Meiji era Japanese woodblocks.
Rackham’s work is often described as a fusion of a northern European ‘Nordic’ style strongly influenced by the Japanese woodblock tradition of the 19th century.

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